Eastern Equine Encephalitis Virus (EEEV)

Spring and summer season means vacation time, beach weather and outdoor fun. But with change in the weather, means change in our exposures to different environments and our susceptibility to different viruses and bacteria. We can stay healthy and safe by taking precautions to maintain good overall health and to prevent exposure to EEEV. Read more information below about what EEEV is and what you can do to reduce your exposure.

FAQ About Eastern Equine Encephalitis

What is Eastern Equine Encephalitis (EEE)? How common is EEE in Massachusetts? How do people get infected with EEEV? Where and when have most cases of EEE occurred? Who is at risk for infection with EEEV? How soon do people get sick after getting bitten by an infected mosquito? What are the symptoms of EEE? How is EEE diagnosed? What is the treatment for EEE? How can people reduce the chance of getting infected with EEEV? What should I do if I think a family member/ might have EEE?

Map: From 1964 through 2008, human EEE cases have been reported in Alabama (7), Delaware (3), Florida (66), Georgia (28), Indiana (3), Louisiana (16), Maryland (4), Massachusetts (35), Michigan (13), Mississippi (6), New Hampshire (11), New Jersey (20), New York (2), North Carolina (16), Pennsylvania (2), Rhode Island (5), South Carolina (13), Texas (2), Virginia (4), and Wisconsin (1).

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Mosquitoes can begin to multiply in any puddle or standing water that lasts for more than four days! Mosquito breeding sites can be anywhere. Take action to reduce the number of mosquitoes around your home and neighborhood. Organize a neighborhood clean up day to pick up containers from vacant lots and parks and to encourage people to keep their yards free of standing water. Mosquitoes don't care about fences, so it's important to remove areas of standing water throughout the neighborhood. [Download West Nile Virus fact sheet...]